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20120501
20120531
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)
have to have some kind of framework, a strategic partnership between afghanistan and the united states. so if it wasn't this day, it would have had to have been in the next few days. i think president obama gave a very strong speech. imagine if you've been serving in afghanistan for years, i don't think it was triumphless, we've decimated a lot of al qaeda. but there's still rocky times ahead. the strategic partnership signed to only time will tell. but it was a good move to make as we head into the summer where we're going to be bringing home about 25,000 more u.s. troops. >> let's take another listen to a clip from the president's speech tonight. i agree. i don't think it was overtly. let's listen to this. >> as we emerge from a decade of conflict abroad and economic crisis at home, it's time to renew america. an america where our children live free from fear and have the skills to claim their dreams. a united america of grit and resilience. where sunlight glistens off soaring new towers in downtown manhattan and we build our future as one people, as one nation. >> let's turn to wolf
, and the story that took him down. >>> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> why they charge the president with putting politics ahead of their safety. >>> and only in america. the real bin laden battle. why it's not about politics. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. our big story tonight breaking news. president obama's surprise trip to afghanistan and his speech to americans on the one year anniversary of the mission to take out osama bin laden. >> my fellow americans, we've traveled through more than a decade under the dark cloud of war. yet here in the pre-dawn darkness of afghanistan, we can see the light of a new day on the hordes. the iraq war is over. the number of our troops in harm's way has been cut in half and more will soon be coming home. we have a clear path to fulfill our mission in afghanistan while delivering justice to al qaeda. >> plenty reaction to this momentous day coming up soon. plus my interview with a man who reportered first in the '80s. and why some navy s.e.a.l.s charged that the white ho
trying to get eventually on to an airliner going into the united states. you obviously saw that before on christmas day 2009 with the ni gearian recruit, that was a very close call. the detonator worked. it was just the main charge, a substance called petn that didn't detonate, and the reason that that probably didn't detonate was that this underwear he had been wearing for three weeks. by ibrahim is someone who has learned from his mistakes, he's grown more sophisticated so the concern is he's still out there and he's making more and more sophisticated bombs. let me ask you a broader question, the tornado of al qaeda is that it's not really one entity. it can be a number of terrorist groups that operate under that mantle in totally different ways. what would you say is going on inside al qaeda as an organization? >> i would guess they're going crazy. the mastermind bombmaker must have found out that his cover had been blown. i would say they're panicking, they're shutting down all their communications which is sort of how they would talk to each other and basically trying to go under
on what we feel is a failure. i mean since we've been there, we in the united states have not been attacked again by al qaeda. if we broaden the definition of success to a stable and humane afghanistan, i mean right now this is the lowest level of civilian casualties in that country in 30 years. i think when we leave there's a very good chance that violence will go up and the war will escalate and you will have essentially the civil war of the 1990s, the northern alliance against the taliban backed by pakistan. it's got to be clear to the taliban right now that the consequences of renewing a relationship with al qaeda will be very possibly renewed american involvement. i mean they can't have not taken that lesson from the months following 9/11. so what may be happening is that there are back channel communications with the taliban where basically there's an accommodation arranged, if you do not harbor terrorists, we will not mess with you. i'm just guessing, but i can imagine that happening. >> sebastian junger, thank you very much for joining me. >> thank you. >>> as president oba
've always been keen to say that the president of the united states and america are friends are israel. but friends can come in many qualities. who do you think -- >> high quality friends. >> okay. what would be a higher quality friend come november, president obama or potentially president mitt romney, do you think? >> oh, i can't say, i'm sorry. i don't think that there's a shortage of energy in this race in america. i just noticed here joe biden speaking. i couldn't hear him, the volume was muted -- >> it was unbelievable. >> there is energy, kind of into this race. i don't think that we have to contribute to it in any way. >> you're not concerned about the outcome either way. you think whoever wins would still be a resolute friend of israel. >> i think it's improper for an israeli political leader to express a public -- publicly any judgment or even to make remarks. it doesn't mean that we -- we just respect the american process and want the american people to make your judgment. it's up to the american people. our tradition is -- american presidents all along the years, from both
. but for right now, what i'm focused on is the president of the united states just said he stands fully with gay and lesbian americans. when i heard him say it, i was teary. >> it was a seismic, historic moment. i mean one of the biggest, i would say, in terms of any kind of social, civil issues since the civil rights movement. and i think the fact that you had the first black president saying this as well showed really how far america has come. an extraordinary day. >> i think the symbolism is meaningful and extraordinary, yeah. >> it really is. it would have been unthinkable a few decades ago. in terms of what happens now, the critics will be jumping up and say, okay, this is all very well but he's made it clear it should be left to the states to decide whether they bring in gay marriage. we've already seen in north carolina steps being taken by certain voters in certain states to try and guarantee that it doesn't come into their state. what do you think this will do to the debate in america? >> well, i mean the presidency above everything else is a bully pulpit. this is a decision that ultima
and what should be done about the negotiations first. we strongly believe and rely upon the united states and the other members of the ap-5 plus one and expect them to set the boundary that becomes clear however long it takes it will block iran from turning military nuclear. it means there is a need to stop enriching uranium to 20% or even to 3.5%. to take all the enrichment out of the country. you can allow them to play with a neglible amount that will never be enough to one single air weapon. and basically there is an installation. so if all these elements are set and the iaea has kind of a inspection, that's it. but if the world community will set the threshold in a way that even is fully accepted, not to mention if partially accepted by the iranians, but if fully accepted it still allows them to keep moving toward nuclear and military program -- >> your concern. >> that's ridiculous. it's a delusion. >> but your main concern is that the iranians may in this time that goes on, they may start to move the uranium enriching process into areas, mountainous areas perhaps, where they cannot
of the united states calls and says, "they're going to impeach me in the morning. what should i do?" >> did that actually happen? bill clinton called in 1998, and said, tony, they may be impeaching me in the morning, what should i do? what an extraordinary position of responsibility. >> i'm sure i'm not the only person he called. >> you're one of the people he called. >> by any stretch. yes. >> step back for a moment. that moment, how did you feel? despite all these incredible things you've experienced, to have the president of your country call you in his great hour of need. >> well, you know, if you're thinking about yourself in a moment like that, you can't really serve. so then it would be all about you. what i felt was a sense of responsibility. and i also felt i needed to tell him straight what i really believed. i knew he was going to get different opinions. and i don't really talk about what i do with someone unless they speak about it. but i did speak at that point and said, frankly, you're not going to be impeached in the morning. easy for me to say. i'm not in your position. just
be president of the united states of america. so that deserves close examination. he put people out of work. >> it will also come down to a matter of trust. although president obama has a good record in certain areas, the car industry and so on, and i think a lot of notable successes in foreign policy. if you look at guantanamo bay, i was thrilled to hear president obama say one of his commitments would be the closure of guantanamo bay an institution that flies in the face of american justice. then he went back on his word. so how when he makes a series of further promises about what he will do in a second term, why should we believe him? >> we should believe him because of the things that he's done in the first term. president barack obama said he would bring health care to all americans. he did that. president obama said that he would straighten out our financial institution mess -- again, that was handed to him. he did that. he's been a champion for civil rights, brought people together, helped to uniify the country. >> i get all that, but what about the things he promised to do and didn
be avoided at all costs. and we should do everything we can to get the united states to deal with conflicts before they -- people start resorting to violence. because violence just begets violence. it's easy to start wars and very difficult to stop them once they've gotten started. i think we got a renounce war. and have -- let the courts handle it. have arbitration at the united nations and let them handle it. and be bound by what those decisions are just like we do with the courts here in the united states. if everybody started shooting everybody they had a disagreement with, all we'd be doing is shooting each other. there's enough of that anyway. that doesn't accomplish anything except gets people shot and escalate into war. >> what would you do about iran if you were the american president? >> well, first of all i believe in total nuclear disarmament. that's the only way we're -- we all got to play by the same set of rules. we have 2,000 or several thousand nuclear weapons. iran has none at the current time. it's okay for israel to have a hundred, but not okay for iran to have two. that
adversary. it's the government. it's the united states of america against x. and the only one standing next to x is me. and it's a daunting responsibility. >> having said that, when you believe overwhelmingly in a client's innocence for example p. diddy, it was so intense for you personally that when he was acquitted you wept for him. which is extraordinary. talk to me about what was going through your head. >> we were waiting for a verdict for hours and days. all of a sudden there was a verdict. i remember standing there thinking to myself here's a man who's innocent. he's put his life in my hands. i've done a good job. if i win this case, he is probably going to turn out to be one of the most successful african-american entrepreneurs over the history of the world. and he has. and if i lose this case he's going to lose everything. when they said the final not guilty, i thought i was having a stroke. i started to cry because the pressure was so thick you could grab it. i don't think i've ever been able to accurately describe what listening to a verdict means. not only to the person who's go
this morning. we have breaking news out of china. preparing to head for the united states. chen, his wife and two children -- >> dr. ozz, welcome. it originally said philanthropist, tv star, oh, you know, it's right after you. >> i had the best time. >> it was brilliant. you interviewed my wife. and she says she came back bubbling with enthusiasm because you had actively instructed her to improve her health by drinking more wine and having more sex. >> yes, i did that as a favor to you, piers. >> thank you. >> you know, the fascinating thing, and i talked about doing a free clinic in los angeles. i gave a lot of insight into how she thought about health in this country. of course, you're talking about a foreign national in america, you're seeing huge opportunities. so maybe nudge ourselves in a better direction which is maybe fundamentally. >> it was a fascinating exercise. you just had thousands of people turning up from the lowest elements in society in terms of ability to pay for health care or anything like that. some of the appalling, long term tumors and so on, what do you do that f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)